Socialnomics – Why Social Media?

Today, I am attending a great Social Media Marketing Conference produced by Fred Pryor and hosted at the Hilton Garden Inn in Oxnard, CA.  For me,  it is a great refresher course about a very complex process and a reminder of how to use social media appropriately for greater marketing.  It is almost counter intuitive to one directional messages as the social two way aspect creates a more tailored and loyal audience.  This is also a great time to reflect upon my social marketing successes and failures, and to explore the concepts of Socialnomics and the social sales cycle.

One primary goal of social marketing is to find your audience and to create your audience through the social marketing tool.  You want to find/establish an audience that knows, likes, and trusts what you are saying so that when you advertise something your audience knows, likes, and trusts what you are advertising.  You need to be genuine, and you need to create atmosphere of learning, informing, and providing.  It is extremely beneficial also to let others shine.  You don’t have to create all the content.  You can be a collector of recommending content.

Second is to simply watch this video about why this is so import today.  Hey, you may even want to watch it twice.  This video provides some great definition in why this is so important.  It even provides purpose for encouraging your organization to use this process for increasing customers in my case enrollments in distance education.

Thirdly, examine the social sales cycle:  Awareness, Interest, Consideration, Intent, Evaluation, and Purchase.  The cycle gives control to the buyer, and the organization needs to be honest and transparent.  It needs to be personalized.  It needs to be consistent and it needs to communicate to the individual.

Quote: “Any business that you are getting because of price you can lose just as easily because lack of trust, like, or knowledge. How do you get the customer to stay and remain loyal?  In my case how do you retain the enrolled student?”

Fourthly,  Tools are simply that.  Whether you are using a blog, microblog, social message, photo sharing, multimedia sharing, review, or any other social site.  It is a tool.  How you use it is more important.  Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, WordPress, Periscope, Digg, Instagram . . . they are just tools.  You want to turn strangers into friends, friends into customers, customers into evangelists.   That is the return on investment.

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Webinar for Veteran’s Day Theme

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

edWeb.net to host a webinar with Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient Clint Romesha

PRINCETON, NJ, October 28, 2014 – edWeb.net and the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation (CMOHF) will present a special live webinar, “Heroism in the War on Terror: An Interview with Clint Romesha, Medal of Honor Recipient,” on Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 1 p.m. Eastern Time.

Teachers are invited to bring their students and their questions as they listen to Medal of Honor Recipient, Clinton L. Romesha, Staff Sergeant Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division.

Staff Sergeant Clint Romesha was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in the October 3, 2009 battle at Outpost Keating in the Nuristan Province of Afghanistan. Five years later, in this interview with Medal of Honor Foundation President Ron Rand, Romesha will reflect on that day and the direction his life has taken since.

Now a working civilian, husband, father, and one of the youngest of the 79 living Medal of Honor recipients, Romesha dedicates some of his precious free time to sharing his story with teachers and students. During this webinar, he will take questions from the audience and share his thoughts on his experiences.

To join this important event, teachers can register here. Teachers are encouraged to submit a question from their students for Mr. Romesha.

Lisa Schmucki, the founder and CEO of edWeb.net, commented, “This is a very special honor to host an online community where recipients of the Medal of Honor can speak directly to teachers and students about their experiences and the values of bravery, commitment, and self-sacrifice.”

edWeb.net and the CMOHF have created an online professional learning community that is free and will host webinars and online discussions on the important concepts of courage, commitment, sacrifice, patriotism, integrity and citizenship. The webinars will provide an opportunity for Medal of Honor Recipients to discuss the importance of character and speak directly with teachers and students on their experiences. The webinars will be facilitated by an educator from the Medal of Honor Foundation and will include demonstrations on how to use the curriculum in the classroom.

If you are an educator, join the free learning community, Lessons of Personal Bravery and Self-Sacrifice: The Medal of Honor Character Development Program, to stay informed about upcoming webinars, join in on discussions with peers and experts, and gain access to valuable resources.

For more information, contact: 

Jenifer Morack, Program Development, edWeb.net
609-439-8103 | jenifer@edweb.net

Cathy Metcalf, Vice President, Education, Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation
714-609-4996 | cmetcalf@cmohfoundation.org

Hour of Code

Although I have been busy with a new position in instructional design for online education at a community college, I want to continue to add educational technology posts at this site and keep you posted of great ideas out there.  As a part time developer of educational apps for the iPad and iPhone (iOS platform) and as a coder of Objective C, SpriteKit, Cocoa Touch, and many other Frameworks, it would not have been possible to have released my apps on the App Store at Apple without studying computer programming. There are many applications of computer programming in today’s world as you will see in the video.  I hope this Hour of Code Video inspires you to consider using their materials in your classroom or at the very least to promote these services to your students.

EDTEC Thoughts for Dedicated Readers and EDTEC Enthusiasts

 

English: Costco in Moncton, New BrunswickThese past two months have been complicated with job interviews, conferences, clients, and iOS7 application development, and I missed the mark in regards to writing on a weekly basis.  In efforts to sincerely apologize, I want to give you an easy list of top ten current thoughts for the past two months this Spring of 2014.  This is for my dedicated readers of this blog and other educational technology enthusiasts.  As always this list is full of my professional observations and opinions.

1.  Windows 8.1 computers that are purchased at Costco are a great choice to recommend as they have been well-tested.  I have set up two of these computers recently for clients.  One was an HP All in One, and the other was an HP Laptop.  Clients were satisfied with price, functionality, and touch screen.

2.  Based upon years of experience, I believe that Apple Computer products in schools will run more efficiently with less need for maintenance than a PC Environment.  While I believe in great computers whether PC or MAC, I believe there will be less cost on maintenance and repair in an Apple campus, and I believe those savings will outweigh the initial startup costs of Apple products.  Students, Faculty, Parents, and Support Staff are usually happier too as they can spend more time on the creative learning and application to subject matter.

3.  I had the pleasure of testing Lenovo laptops at a recent conference, and they are well worth considering for PC users and PC organizations. Look at the Lenovo Yoga and the Lenovo Thinkpad series.  I don’t believe they are sold at Costco, but they have great deals for educators at their site.  If you have never heard of Lenovo then just remember that it is the old IBM brand.

4.  3D printing has great applications to the modern classroom for science, mathematics, architecture, and sculpting.  I would suggest that schools invest in a 3D printer and that they find ways to use it in their curriculum.

5.  Blogging is here to stay, and it is a great record for student portfolios.  They can be made private, public, or in combinations to be shared with educators, scholarship advisers, donors, admissions representatives, and select users if privacy is a concern.

6.  I hope you have heard of Google Apps for education, and I hope you have explored Outlook.com and One Drive from Microsoft.  Both of these organizations are offering a great way to create, store, access anywhere, and share documents, spreadsheets, and presentations.  There are free versions for individuals and better free versions for educational communities.  Most people who are familiar with MS Office will be happy with One Drive.

7.  Robotics is a great program to support, teach, and advise, and students can participate in competitions with big rewards.  Get Started Today!

8.  Computer programming jobs will continue to be available in the future as hardware technologies improve and as consumers demand the ease of product usage.  Why we don’t teach more computer programming in our schools is beyond my comprehension.  The students with computer programming backgrounds will be able to develop their ideas into prototypes in the future that will bring about new business for the US and the world.

9.  I am still going to have a shameless plug for Zoombla, a math app for ages 8 and above.  It is definitely not Zombie Math, but it will definitely force students to use and practice math skills.  It also encourages face to face competition so that students are still communicating and using real time social skills in the classroom.  Zoombla – Matt Moore

10.  An entire generation uses facetime, skype, and gaming devices such as the Xbox and Wii to video conference daily, yet I still see a lot of schools not using video conferencing for educational purposes.  Teachers should reach out to real time meetings with subject matter experts, authors, universities, and or other schools in distant locations.  Why not?  Isn’t collaboration a 21st century skill?

Have a great Spring!  Perhaps I will find time to elaborate in the future.  As always I appreciate your comments, suggestions, and advice.

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Which STEM skills are you teaching?

The A8N VM CSM, an ASUS microATX motherboard

The A8N VM CSM, an ASUS microATX motherboard (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I was recently reading an article from Elearning (www.2learning.com) where it states that “only 15% of college students (United States) are in Engineering and Science, where many of the high-tech jobs reside. That number compares to 50% in China, 67% in Singapore, and 47% in France.”  I found this alarming as the future economy depends upon technological advancements, inventions, applications, and products.  I also found this relative to a previous article that I wrote about students learning to code software as all of these devices need instructions (software) that tell the device what to do.

In addition, the article stated that “Leland Melvin, head of NASA’s education programs and head of the President’s STEM council, said that there are 1 million jobs that can’t be filled because people lack the requisite skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).” It seems logical then to encourage students to study STEM skills at younger ages and to provide them with unique STEM courses to explore the future.  In fact, there might be a need to develop stronger STEM programs in our public schools.  It might even mean a shift in how school programs are offered.

I have seen many independent private schools build new science buildings in the past decade to tackle this need, and I am noticing that the local public high schools in my town are offering a pre-medical type program, an international baccalaureate, and a technology magnet school program for qualified applicants.  While we are moving in the correct direction, it appears that we have a long way to go.

If you have some time, please share what unique STEM skills are being taught at your school.

 

 

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Student Digital Media Contests

With the ease and low cost of digital video editing software upon both the MAC and the PC, students are story boarding, filming, editing, and publishing great video work that demonstrates 21st century learning skills, fabulous creativity, and remarkable usage of sophisticated tools.  Some students elect to create video projects instead of papers, and they excel demonstrating these skills while relating to your academic content in creative ways.  If you have students with this talent, you should consider forwarding their projects for recognition and perhaps scholarships.

In the state of California there is a California Student Media Festival which celebrates student work annually, invites winners to a state educational technology conference, and awards nice prizes for students to continue pursuing their hobby or scholarships to college.  Adobe also sponsors the Adobe Youth Voices Awards for 13 – 19 year olds in order to recognize outstanding digital projects that promote social change.  C-SPAN hosts Student Cam, and is currently asking students “What is the most important issue that Congress should consider in 2013?”, and the Office of the President of the United States currently hosts a Student Film Festival.

Your students may not even take a course in video, but they have the passion for developing quality stories through this media.  Their projects deserve our attention, and these organizations are respectfully reviewing them with many awards, recognitions, and even monetary prizes.  If you have students creating intriguing informational content, exhibiting fabulous acting, capturing incredible photography, or producing unique points of view then you should make your students aware of these opportunities.

annual Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) Awards, which recognize digital media produced by youth ages 13-19 focused on driving social change in their communities. – See more at: http://www.techlearning.com/Default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=7040#sthash.a2mPYRmH.dpuf
annual Adobe Youth Voices (AYV) Awards, which recognize digital media produced by youth ages 13-19 focused on driving social change in their communities. – See more at: http://www.techlearning.com/Default.aspx?tabid=67&entryid=7040#sthash.a2mPYRmH.dpuf
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will.i.am wants you to learn how to program

Code.org has been running a campaign to increase the amount students who take computer programming courses in the United States.  Their logic is simple.  “Computer Science is a top paying degree, and computer programming jobs are growing at twice the national average.”  No matter what field a student plans to negotiate in his or her career a substantial knowledge of computer programming can enhance the solving of future needs, create new opportunities, and spawn new business growth.

will.i.am who is famous for using computer programming techniques and methods in his music states that “Here we are, 2013, we ALL depend on technology to communicate, to bank, and none of us know how to read and write code. It’s important for these kids, right now, starting at 8 years old, to read and write code.“ He will credit his knowledge of computer science as a vital tool for creating new music as will others such as Kaskade, a world-famous DJ.

But we do not have to travel far into complex art to see great potential in America.  Jobs, Gates, and Zuckerberg are all known for being dissatisfied with the traditional route of education and yet they made huge successes by departing the college track and getting projects done.  There must be something we can learn from how they learn, design, develop, test, and publish.  There must be a success formula in there than can help students achieve life long goals and increase potential.

Yet, we still don’t teach or require computer programming in most of our schools.  Let me ask you, did your school participate in the “Hour of Coding”, a nation wide recognition of computer science learning?  I saw a lot about it on the news, but I did not hear or read anything from my teacher friends.  In fact, I heard many answers such as “no, we did not” or “What is that?”.

I am also curious if you are listening to our politicians’ concerns about our future.  Here is Senator Marco Rubio‘s quote.  “Computer programmers are in great demand by American businesses, across the tech sector, banking, entertainment, you name it. These are some of the highest-paying jobs, but there are not enough graduates to fill these opportunities.“  The current potential of American opportunity and stability depends upon sufficient and competent in-house programmers.

If you are interested in learning more about how you can help your school teach computer science please go to code.org, watch their promotional video, use their materials, and point students to tutorials they could explore tomorrow.  You might find that some of them can get good paying jobs while they are in college.  That is what Chris Bosh, a famous basketball player from Georgia Tech, explains to others when he is interviewed about computer programming.  Computer programming teaches students how to design, develop, analyze, learn from failure, and overcome complex issues that will create job opportunities tomorrow.

 

 

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